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Parkinson’s Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments


parkinson's disease - causes, symptoms, and tratements

What is Parkinson's Disease?

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It is caused by the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons in a specific area of the brain called the Substantia nigra. The loss of dopamine leads to a deficiency of this neurotransmitter, which is responsible for transmitting signals between nerve cells. This deficiency leads to the characteristic symptoms of PD, such as tremors, stiffness, and difficulty with balance and coordination.


The symptoms of Parkinson's disease can be divided into three main categories: motor, non-motor and autonomic symptoms.


  • Motor symptoms are typically the most obvious and include tremors, stiffness, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), and postural instability (difficulty maintaining balance).

  • Non-motor symptoms can include depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and cognitive impairment.

  • Autonomic symptoms can include blood pressure changes, constipation, and urinary problems.


What is the main cause of Parkinson's disease?

main cause of parkinson's disease

The exact cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not fully understood, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors.


Genetic factors: Some genetic mutations have been found to be associated with PD, such as mutations in the SNCA, LRRK2, GBA and PARK genes. These mutations increase the risk of developing PD, but it is not yet known how these mutations lead to the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons.


Environmental factors: Some studies have suggested that exposure to certain toxins, such as pesticides and herbicides, may increase the risk of developing PD. Other studies have suggested that head injuries may also increase the risk of PD.


Neuroinflammation: Some studies have suggested that Parkinson's disease may be related to an abnormal immune response in the brain. The abnormal immune response leads to inflammation in the brain, which may contribute to the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons.


Mitochondrial dysfunction: Studies have suggested that Parkinson's disease might be caused by the dysfunction of mitochondria in the brain. Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cells, they produce energy and when they fail to work properly, it leads to the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons.


Alpha-synuclein: Parkinson's disease is associated with the abnormal accumulation of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain. This protein forms clumps that are called Lewy bodies and they are found in the dopamine-producing neurons of the brain in people with PD.


What does Parkinson's disease do to a person?

Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It is caused by the degeneration or death of dopamine-producing cells in the brain, which leads to a lack of dopamine, a chemical that helps to regulate movement and coordination. As the disease progresses, it can lead to a number of physical, cognitive and emotional symptoms that can affect a person's quality of life.


What is the life expectancy with Parkinsons disease?

The life expectancy of people with Parkinson's disease can vary depending on a number of factors such as the stage of the disease, the age of onset, overall health, and access to appropriate care.

On average, people with Parkinson's disease have a life expectancy that is similar to that of people without the disease. However, as the disease progresses, it can lead to complications such as falls, pneumonia, and other medical conditions that can shorten life expectancy.

According to the Parkinson's Disease Foundation, the average life expectancy for people with Parkinson's disease is around 5-10 years less than that of the general population. However, some people may live with the disease for many years, with a good quality of life, while others may have a more rapid progression and experience more severe symptoms.

With early diagnosis, appropriate treatment and management, access to specialized care, and a healthy lifestyle people with Parkinson's disease can have a good quality of life and live with the disease for many years. It's important to consult with a healthcare provider for personalized information and guidance.


Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease

symptoms of parkinson's disease

Physical symptoms of Parkinson's disease can include:

  • Tremors or shaking in the hands, arms, legs, jaw, or face.

  • Stiffness or rigidity in the limbs and trunk.

  • Slow movement (bradykinesia)

  • Difficulty with balance and coordination.

  • Masked face ( little or no expression on the face)

  • Speech changes, such as speaking more softly or quickly, or having trouble articulating words.

Cognitive symptoms of Parkinson's disease can include:

  • Difficulty with memory and concentration.

  • Dementia in advanced stages of the disease.

Emotional symptoms of Parkinson's disease can include:

  • Depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders.

  • Difficulty with emotional expression.

As the disease progresses, symptoms can become more severe and can lead to an increased risk of falls, difficulty with daily activities such as dressing, bathing and cooking, and social isolation

How can I avoid Parkinson's?

There is currently no known way to prevent Parkinson's disease. The exact causes of the disease are still not fully understood, and it is thought to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.


lifestyle factors to lower the risk of parkinson's disease

However, research has suggested that certain lifestyle factors may lower the risk of developing Parkinson's disease or delay the onset of symptoms:

  • Regular physical activity: Regular physical activity can improve overall health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases, and may lower the risk of Parkinson's disease.

  • Eating a healthy diet: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein may also lower the risk of Parkinson's disease.

  • Avoiding exposure to toxins: Some studies have suggested that exposure to certain toxins, such as pesticides and herbicides, may increase the risk of Parkinson's disease.

  • Avoiding smoking: Smoking is associated with many health risks and it has been shown that smokers have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

  • Managing stress: Managing stress and maintaining a positive attitude can help to improve overall well-being and may also lower the risk of Parkinson's disease.


What organs does Parkinson's disease affect?

The part of the brain affected by Parkinson's disease is called the substantia nigra, which is responsible for producing a chemical called dopamine that helps to regulate movement and coordination.

As the dopamine-producing cells in the substantia nigra die, the brain is unable to produce enough dopamine to properly control movement, leading to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as tremors, stiffness, and difficulty with coordination and balance.


systems, organs affected by parkinson's disease


In addition to the neurological effects, Parkinson's disease can also affect other organs and systems in the body, including:

  • Gastrointestinal system: Constipation and difficulty swallowing can occur.

  • Cardiovascular system: High blood pressure, heart problems, and orthostatic hypotension

  • Respiratory system: Difficulty with breathing and sleep apnea

  • Musculoskeletal system: Stiffness, muscle rigidity and difficulty with balance.

  • Endocrine system: Hormonal imbalances.

  • Mental and emotional well-being: Depression, anxiety, and cognitive decline are common.

Here are early symptoms that can raise concern for Parkinson's disease:

The early symptoms of Parkinson's disease can be subtle and may not be immediately recognized as signs of a serious condition. However, there are certain symptoms that can raise concern for Parkinson's disease:

  1. Tremors: Tremors, or shaking, in the hands, arms, legs, jaw, or face are a common early symptom of Parkinson's disease. These tremors are often most noticeable when the affected body part is at rest, and may be accompanied by stiffness or rigidity.

  2. Bradykinesia: Bradykinesia, or slowness of movement, is another common early symptom of Parkinson's disease. People with this condition may have difficulty initiating movement or completing tasks that require fine motor skills.

  3. Rigidity: Rigidity, or stiffness, in the limbs and trunk is another early symptom of Parkinson's disease. This stiffness can make it difficult to move or change positions.

  4. Postural instability: Difficulty with balance and coordination can also be an early symptom of Parkinson's disease. People with this condition may have trouble walking or standing, and may be at risk of falling.

  5. Masked face: People with Parkinson's disease may have a "masked" face, which means they have little or no expression on their face and it can look as if they are not showing emotions.

  6. Speech changes: Some people with Parkinson's disease may also experience changes in their speech, such as speaking more softly or more quickly, or having trouble articulating words.


Diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease

The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease can be challenging as the symptoms can be similar to those of other conditions and can vary from person to person. However, there are certain diagnostic criteria that healthcare providers use to diagnose Parkinson's disease:

  1. Medical history and physical examination: The healthcare provider will take a detailed medical history, including a family history of Parkinson's disease, and will conduct a physical examination to evaluate symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and bradykinesia.

  2. Neurological examination: The healthcare provider will also conduct a neurological examination to assess reflexes, muscle strength, and coordination. They will also check for other signs of Parkinson's disease, such as a "pill-rolling" tremor and a stooped posture.

  3. Imaging tests: Imaging tests, such as an MRI or CT scan, may be used to rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms.

  4. Dopamine transporter imaging (DaTscan): A special type of imaging test that uses a small amount of radioactive material to produce detailed images of the brain and help identify the specific areas of the brain that are affected by Parkinson's disease.

  5. Laboratory tests: The healthcare provider may also conduct laboratory tests to rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms.

  6. Movement disorder specialists: A movement disorder specialist, such as a neurologist or geriatrician, may be consulted to help


Treatments for Parkinson’s disease


treatments for parkinson's disease


The treatment of Parkinson's disease is aimed at managing symptoms and improving the quality of life for people with the condition. There is currently no cure for Parkinson's disease, but treatment options can help to manage symptoms and slow the progression of the disease.

Medications: A number of medications can be used to increase the level of dopamine in the brain, or to mimic its effects.

Physiotherapy and exercise: Physiotherapy and exercise can help to improve mobility, balance, and coordination, and can also help to relieve stiffness and pain.

Occupational therapy: Occupational therapy can help people with Parkinson's disease to adapt to the changes in their abilities and to maintain independence in their daily activities.


Speech and Language therapy: Is a form of rehabilitation that is used to help people with communication and swallowing disorders. It can be used to help people with Parkinson's disease who may have difficulty speaking, swallowing, or communicating effectively.


Swallowing therapy: Swallowing therapy, also known as dysphagia therapy, is a treatment option for individuals with Parkinson's disease who have difficulty swallowing. This therapy may include exercises and techniques to improve the coordination and strength of the muscles used in swallowing, as well as strategies to help with safe swallowing and reducing the risk of aspiration.

Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be an option to help control symptoms. The most common surgical procedure is called deep brain stimulation (DBS), which involves implanting electrodes into the brain to help regulate the electrical activity in the brain.

Deep brain stimulation: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical treatment option for Parkinson's disease that involves implanting electrodes into specific areas of the brain. These electrodes send electrical impulses to the brain, which can help to improve symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and bradykinesia.

It's important to note that the treatment plan for Parkinson's disease should be tailored to the individual's specific needs and symptoms, and that the treatment plan may change over time as the disease progresses. It is important to consult with a neurologist or healthcare provider for personalized information.


Can Parkinson’s disease be cured?

Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson's disease. It is a progressive disorder that affects the nervous system and there is no way to stop or reverse the damage to the brain cells that produce dopamine, a chemical that helps regulate movement.


How does Parkinson's disease affect daily life?

Parkinson's disease can affect daily life by making it difficult to perform everyday tasks such as dressing, bathing, and cooking. It can also affect one's ability to work, and can lead to social isolation.


How does Parkinson's disease progress?

The progression of Parkinson's disease can vary from person to person. Symptoms may start off mild and gradually worsen over time, or they may remain stable for many years before becoming more severe.


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marie jakob
marie jakob
18 janv. 2023

My husband was diagnosed of Parkinsons disease 2 years ago, when he was 49. He had a stooped posture, tremors, right arm does not move and also a pulsating feeling in his body. He was placed on Senemet for 8 months and then Siferol was introduced and replaced the Senemet, during this time span he was also diagnosed with dementia. He started having hallucinations, lost touch with reality. Suspecting it was the medication I took him off the Siferol (with the doctor’s knowledge) and started him on PD natural herbal formula we ordered from Health Care HERBAL CENTRE, his symptoms totally declined over a 3 weeks use of the Health Care HERBAL Parkinsons disease natural herbal formula. He is now…

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